Human Factors Design of the BRM2 (brain rescue machine 2 channel)

Cristina Parra

The brain monitor.

Used on infants, new born babies. Initially the machine only produced ‘squiggly lines’ hard to read and understand quickly. especially in intensive care units, time sensitive situations. Nurses couldn’t read what the BRM2 was communicating. At the time (IDK WHEN) New Zealand only had one neurological pedieatrical expert that could read EGE signals, who could do what this machine does.

–  in order for the machine to work the baby had to be sedated.

HISTORY OF THE BRM2

  • Software was being developed that would allow translation of the ‘squiggly’ lines at Auckland university.
  • Development of the monitor for commercial use in neonatal intensive care (with human babies) was partially owned by the university of Auckland.

REST OF INFO ON SLIDE SHOW

DESIGNING FOR OPTIMAL PERFORMANCES.

STARTING WITH LAMBS BEFORE BABIES

Ensuring that this machine was more efficient then humans as ultimately peoples jobs were being replaced by the machine. Selling that this was a god idea, having the BRM2 around was a good idea, an idea that would save more lives quickly.

Any distributed disruption to the signal from the scalped to the monitor altered the reading of the baby. Slight movements from the baby whether cause by the baby moving or by something else moving the baby can encourage and create brain damage

Idea of the BM2 the monitor will last forever but the electrons were disposable, similar to a printer. the printer continuously work but ink cartridges that are counties brought – this was the how money was go tot be made.

ESSENTIAL FEATURES FOR THE BM2 (user requirements specifications – URS)

  • easy to clean, being able to easily stay hospital grade clean

REST ON SLIDEHOW

CAN YOU SELL IT? HOW CAN YOU SELL IF PEOPLE DONT READILY KNOW WHAT IT IS AND HOW IT IS HELPFUL?

The nurses were the most important part of this equation. they were going to be the ones that apply, remove and use this machine. Being sure when designing that nurses were going to be able to use and complete the process with the machine time efficiently and properly for correct readings. they also need to make sure nurses could read the machines.

The material of the electrodes, babies skin are very thin and fragile. the electrodes needed to solely stay put in the right place but not damage skin. If the set up was too tedious or too harmful to the baby the machine was not going to take off and be successful.

Parents – another factor, they will be constantly around also. What will be displayed on the monitor? Can is be understood to both parents and nurses or just nurses. How much should the parents see? How this would affect them and the situation? Is it better for the parents to know just as much as the doctors and nurses? Or should they just know what the doctors and nurses tell them?

Creating a machine like the BRM2 was such a challenge not only in a technical field or what was possible/available, but also due to the many factors are involved in the situation of the BRM2’s use. Doctors, nurses, parents and the baby that is used in are all different but important factors all with different priorities that ultimately all conclude to the baby being well and healthy. Ensuring that the BRM2 caters to parties adequately was essential for the machine to be successful. Being empathetic to how the parents will be apart of the process. How will the doctor as and nurses use and read the monitor, how will it be in the room?

Convincing the nurses that it was important.

the positioning of the electrodes was a mathematical process which meant that it took time for the nurses to apply. Cristina digs a personalised tape measure that helped guide the positioning. 2 sets, one set for premature babies and one set for full term babies.

HOSPITALS – UNIVERSITIES – MARKETPLACEMENT

Are all totally different places that all interact with the use of the machine and the design development of the machine.

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